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Wine storehouse

Around 1930, this space installed on the ground floor within the cloister was entirely restored, on the initiative of Jean-Jacques Waltz, who became the museum’s chief curator in 1923. Recreated beginning in 1927, from the stone floor to the ceiling beams, this storehouse pays tribute to the art of winemaking, which has been an extremely important aspect of the region’s economy for centuries, and especially in Colmar, the wine capital of Alsace. Here the museum brings together items related to winemaking, from harvest equipment and wine presses, the oldest of which dates back to 1654, to a series of massive sculpted casks, including one from Riquewihr that could hold up to 300 hectolitres. These casks are decorated with sculptures in keeping with the ornamental repertoire in use under the reign of Louis XV. Most of them are also outfitted with a small grate over the tap that could be locked with a key to prevent theft. When it was first completed, the restoration of this Alsatian wine storehouse was celebrated by Georges Henri Rivière, the director of the Musée National des Arts et Traditions Populaires in Paris. This achievement also stands as a testament to museography in the period between the two World Wars. 

Wine storehouse
 

Wine storehouse and presses, 1654–1687; casks, second half of the 18th century, recreated by Jean-Jacques Walz (Hansi), Musée Unterlinden, Colmar.